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Netherlands Cancer Institute takes a significant step in organoid research

Netherlands Cancer Institute takes a significant step in organoid research

The genetic profile of tumor organoids made of metastases of colorectal cancer corresponds with the tumor tissue. That is the conclusion of a research group led by Emile Voest, professor of medical oncology and director of the Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI). The results of the study were published in PNAS on October 12, 2015. This is an important step towards predicting the potential effect of a cancer treatment on an individual level. Continue reading

Statin therapy most beneficial for patients with high genetic risk

Statin therapy most beneficial for patients with high genetic risk

Patients with a high genetic risk of heart attack benefit more from statin therapy than those in intermediate and low-risk categories, according to research published in The Lancet. Although past research consistently showed that statins provide about the same relative risk reduction across all categories of patients, the researchers did find a difference in the effect of statin therapy by looking specifically at genetic risk factors. Continue reading

Skin test might offer new possibilities for research on Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases

Skin test might offer new possibilities for research on Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases

A skin test might shed new light on Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, according to a study that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., April 18 to 25, 2015. The study showed that skin biopsies can be used to detect elevated levels of abnormal proteins found in the two diseases. Continue reading

Current obesity treatments strongly questioned

Current obesity treatments strongly questioned

In The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, four obesity experts express strong criticism towards the current treatment of chronic obesity. The researchers argue that obesity is a chronic disease with largely biological causes that cannot just be cured with diet and exercise. Ignoring these biological factors could result in the continued inability to treat obesity effectively and the premature death of millions of individuals each year. Continue reading

Does the vascular graft of the future consist of three layers?

Does the vascular graft of the future consist of three layers?

The future of the vascular graft may lay in a tri-layered composite, according to researchers from Shanghai University. In AIP Advances theresearchers describe why this type of graft could both possess mechanical strength and could promote new cell growth. This could mean the new type of graft would leave behind more rigid new blood vessels than the currently used types. Continue reading

Mitochondrial donation could benefit thousands of parents

Mitochondrial donation could benefit thousands of parents

Mitochondrial donation could benefit thousands of British and American parents, according to an article in the New England Journal of Medicine. Researchers calculated that 2,473 women in the UK and 12,423 women in the US are at risk of passing on mitochondrial DNA disease to their children. This equates to an average of 152 births per year in the UK, and 778 births per year in the US. Continue reading

Association found between Helicobacter Pylori and Multiple Sclerosis

Association found between Helicobacter Pylori and Multiple Sclerosis

Women with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) more often test negative for H. Pylori than women without MS, according to an article in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. The association could mean that H. Pylori protects against the development of MS. Another explanation could be that the gut microbe is a marker for a relatively bad hygiene. According to the hygiene hypothesis, diseases like MS develop because good hygiene results in too few infections in early life, thus failing to prime the immune system enough. Continue reading

British doctors get depressed because of complaints procedures

British doctors get depressed because of complaints procedures

Medical doctors who had to go through a complaints procedure have a significantly elevated risk on mental health problems. Researchers write this in the British Medical Journal. Among other things, doctors involved in a complaints procedure develop symptoms of depression and fear. Also, as a result of complaints procedures, the doctors practice their profession in a more defensive way. Continue reading

Researchers discover cancer suppressing molecule

Researchers discover cancer suppressing molecule

Researchers at the University of Cambridge discovered a molecule that suppresses cancer growth. The molecule, named FDI-6, ensures that transcription factor FOXM1 is not able to bind to DNA. The transcriptional downregulation ensures that tumorgrowth is suppressed. This study could open the door to new treatment methods for cancer. The results are published in the journal Nature Communications. Continue reading

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